Throwback Thursday Posts

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Emerson's award-winning annual report covers in the 1980s were recognized throughout the industry. Obata's goal was to communicate Emerson's brand in a single, powerful image. Our concept was to feature Emerson's high-tech manufacturing capabilities by having the company fabricate the company logo in innovative ways. Techniques and materials included CNC milling, laser etching, microchips, silicon wafers and motor laminations.

John Vandover, Obata's future president, was the creative director and resident genius. Photographer Scott Smith faced the challenge of capturing the best images on 4"x5" sheet film. Lighting of the microchip required a homemade fiber-optic light kit. Exposures were over 5 minutes long. As always, creative challenges require innovative solutions.

Learn more about Obata's creativity and innovation at:
obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory #corporatephotography
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4 days ago

Comment on Facebook

Brings back memories.

Good design and beautiful illustrations are timeless. Alice Hausners stylish watercolor renderings for the pages of Concordia Publishings Arch Books from the 1960s-1970s brought biblical stories to life with bright colors and a modern flair. But sometimes pop culture sneaks in where it is least expected. The Little Sleeping Beauty, published in 1969, was based on the biblical story of Jesus restoring life to a 12-year-old girl. The creative inspiration for the Little Sleeping Beauty seems to have come directly from That Girl starring Marlo Thomas, with a little bit of I Dream of Jeannie thrown in for good measure. Both TV shows were prime-time sensations in the late 1960s.

A modern look and contemporary references can often help connect with an audience. Obatas illustrations and creative work on childrens books and textbooks in the past fits our mission of simplifying complex communication to maximize audience understanding. Learn more at:
https://obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory

Good design and beautiful illustrations are timeless. Alice Hausner's stylish watercolor renderings for the pages of Concordia Publishing's Arch Books from the 1960s-1970s brought biblical stories to life with bright colors and a modern flair. But sometimes pop culture sneaks in where it is least expected. "The Little Sleeping Beauty", published in 1969, was based on the biblical story of Jesus restoring life to a 12-year-old girl. The creative inspiration for the Little Sleeping Beauty seems to have come directly from "That Girl" starring Marlo Thomas, with a little bit of "I Dream of Jeannie" thrown in for good measure. Both TV shows were prime-time sensations in the late 1960s.

A modern look and contemporary references can often help connect with an audience. Obata's illustrations and creative work on children's books and textbooks in the past fits our mission of simplifying complex communication to maximize audience understanding. Learn more at:
obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
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2 weeks ago

Comment on Facebook

I think I have a couple of those biblical story books 😊

Google “That Girl” photos. It’s pretty funny.

Welcome to the typical design firm of the 1980s, where knit ties and Sony Walkmans ruled and smoking at your desk was common. The disruptive technology of the age was the fax machine, a time-saving device that made snail mail and couriers practically obsolete.

Today's Obata looks a little bit different, but our commitment to innovative ideas and creative communication solutions remains. For more than 70 years, Obata has been simplifying complex communications to maximize understanding and inspire meaningful audience-driven action.

Learn more at:
obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #stlhistory
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3 weeks ago

Comment on Facebook

It’s so great to see familiar faces!

Seventy-five years ago, Obata co-founder Alice Hausner decided it was time to start over. In December of 1945, she quit her job at a display company, rented a one-room office downtown and opened shop as a freelance illustrator. Alice, at age 25, did not fit the stereotype of the typical Mad Men in the advertising business at the time, but she had the guts, the drive and the perseverance needed to become a success.

As we reach the end of 2020, we understand the desire to start over. Seventy-five years after Alice struck out on her own, Obata is still known for our drive and perseverance.  Were ready to put 2020 behind us and build a better 2021. 

Learn more at:
https://obata.com/

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory

Seventy-five years ago, Obata co-founder Alice Hausner decided it was time to start over. In December of 1945, she quit her job at a display company, rented a one-room office downtown and opened shop as a freelance illustrator. Alice, at age 25, did not fit the stereotype of the typical "Mad Men" in the advertising business at the time, but she had the guts, the drive and the perseverance needed to become a success.

As we reach the end of 2020, we understand the desire to start over. Seventy-five years after Alice struck out on her own, Obata is still known for our drive and perseverance. We're ready to put 2020 behind us and build a better 2021.

Learn more at:
obata.com/

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago

Comment on Facebook

She was one of a kind! And always so kind to us❤️

Todays post features an unexpected gift. A few months ago, the Missouri Historical Society contacted us about a painting they had in their collection that was attributed to Chiura Obata, father of our founder Kimio Obata. They suspected it was painted by a different member of the Obata family because it did not match the style or signature found in other examples of Chiura Obatas work. The painting is very likely by Kimio. It looks like the work of a commercial illustrator, and the signature matches signatures and logos used by Kimio Obata. 

We dont know the history of the painting, titled Starry Night Winter, but it is a beautiful, peaceful scene and perfect for the holiday season.

Learn more about Obata at:
https://obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing

Today's post features an unexpected gift. A few months ago, the Missouri Historical Society contacted us about a painting they had in their collection that was attributed to Chiura Obata, father of our founder Kimio Obata. They suspected it was painted by a different member of the Obata family because it did not match the style or signature found in other examples of Chiura Obata's work. The painting is very likely by Kimio. It looks like the work of a commercial illustrator, and the signature matches signatures and logos used by Kimio Obata.

We don't know the history of the painting, titled "Starry Night Winter", but it is a beautiful, peaceful scene and perfect for the holiday season.

Learn more about Obata at:
obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing
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1 month ago

Comment on Facebook

Awesome

Beautiful!

Very cool. Love the style.

Fresh out of high school in 1937, Obata co-founder Rich Haley took a production job at DArcy Advertising, working there for several years before being drafted into the navy. After serving his country in WWII, he returned to St. Louis and got a job with Gardner Advertising, then opened an independent studio doing production work for local ad agencies. Rich was one of many talented designers and production artists sharing space on the paddle boat with Cassell, Watkins, Stevens when he met Obata co-founders Kimio Obata and Alice Hausner. According to an early Obata employee Rich was a helluva production guy and they needed someone like that. 

Learn more about Obatas longevity in St. Louis advertising at:
https://obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistoryImage attachmentImage attachment

Fresh out of high school in 1937, Obata co-founder Rich Haley took a production job at D'Arcy Advertising, working there for several years before being drafted into the navy. After serving his country in WWII, he returned to St. Louis and got a job with Gardner Advertising, then opened an independent studio doing production work for local ad agencies. Rich was one of many talented designers and production artists sharing space on the paddle boat with Cassell, Watkins, Stevens when he met Obata co-founders Kimio Obata and Alice Hausner. According to an early Obata employee "Rich was a helluva production guy and they needed someone like that".

Learn more about Obata's longevity in St. Louis advertising at:
obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
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1 month ago

Comment on Facebook

Handsome looking man and very intelligent.

He was a wonderful man.

Good design can make any subject understandable, fun and relatable. That's especially important when your subject is "Exploring Arithmetic". Obata's illustrations for this 1957 textbook showed students how to design a mid-century modern home, how to budget for $77 per month rent, purchase a car with stylish tail fins, buy car insurance for $46 per year, and calculate your favorite player's batting average.

For more than 70 years, Obata has been simplifying complex communications to maximize understanding and inspire meaningful audience-driven action. Learn more at:
obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Good design can make any subject understandable, fun and relatable. That's especially important when your subject is "Exploring Arithmetic". Obata's illustrations for this 1957 textbook showed students how to design a mid-century modern home, how to budget for $77 per month rent, purchase a car with stylish tail fins, buy car insurance for $46 per year, and calculate your favorite player's batting average.

For more than 70 years, Obata has been simplifying complex communications to maximize understanding and inspire meaningful audience-driven action. Learn more at:
obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

As a technology leader and early adopter of digital photo and video, Obata has become an archive of no longer cutting edge camera gear. Our first digital camera was the Nikon CoolPix900 1.25 megapixel camera with a 17.4mm swivel lens. List price in 1998 was $995. Storage was on a chunky compact flash card that doesnt look very compact today.

Obata was offering in-house photography as early as 1960. Our imaging services have expanded over the years to include video production, photo illustration, animation, motion graphics and 3D modeling...and always at the forefront of technology and capability.

Learn more about the intersection of creativity and technology at:
https://obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
#videoproduction #photography #motiongraphics

As a technology leader and early adopter of digital photo and video, Obata has become an archive of "no longer cutting edge" camera gear. Our first digital camera was the Nikon CoolPix900 1.25 megapixel camera with a 17.4mm swivel lens. List price in 1998 was $995. Storage was on a chunky compact flash card that doesn't look very compact today.

Obata was offering in-house photography as early as 1960. Our imaging services have expanded over the years to include video production, photo illustration, animation, motion graphics and 3D modeling...and always at the forefront of technology and capability.

Learn more about the intersection of creativity and technology at:
obata.com/obata-history

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
#videoproduction #photography #motiongraphics
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

At least the illustrations were fun. Obatas work with Webster Publishing included school textbooks such as this 1957 edition of Exploring Arithmetic.  Illustration credits went to Obata & Associates and Aline Cunningham, a well-known St. Louis-based freelance artist. Obata designed and illustrated several editions of Exploring Arithmetic in the late 1950s and early 1960s. 

Obatas work on childrens books and textbooks fits right in with our mission of simplifying complex communication to maximize audience understanding. Learn more at:
https://obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory

At least the illustrations were fun. Obata's work with Webster Publishing included school textbooks such as this 1957 edition of "Exploring Arithmetic". Illustration credits went to Obata & Associates and Aline Cunningham, a well-known St. Louis-based freelance artist. Obata designed and illustrated several editions of "Exploring Arithmetic" in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Obata's work on childrens books and textbooks fits right in with our mission of simplifying complex communication to maximize audience understanding. Learn more at:
obata.com

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

Comment on Facebook

Such a cool 50s style!

By the early 1960s, co-founder Kimio Obata was merging art and business on a global scale. As Emerson Electric considered international expansion, Kimio served as a consultant on an early joint-venture with Nagoya-based Aichi Electric Co. The deal closed in 1964, with Kimio (in bow tie) joining Emerson and Aichi executives in signing ceremonies.

In 1966, Kimio Obata moved to Japan permanently and established the Obata Corporation in Tokyo. The two Obata locations shared the Emerson account, with several of Obata’s St. Louis-based employees spending six months to a year working in Tokyo. The Obata Corporations major client was the rapidly-expanding advertising giant Dentsu. By 1973, Dentsu had become the worlds largest advertising agency.

Learn more about Obatas deep connections and surprising contributions to global businesses at:
https://obata.com/obata-history/

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory

By the early 1960s, co-founder Kimio Obata was merging art and business on a global scale. As Emerson Electric considered international expansion, Kimio served as a consultant on an early joint-venture with Nagoya-based Aichi Electric Co. The deal closed in 1964, with Kimio (in bow tie) joining Emerson and Aichi executives in signing ceremonies.

In 1966, Kimio Obata moved to Japan permanently and established the Obata Corporation in Tokyo. The two Obata locations shared the Emerson account, with several of Obata’s St. Louis-based employees spending six months to a year working in Tokyo. The Obata Corporation's major client was the rapidly-expanding advertising giant Dentsu. By 1973, Dentsu had become the world's largest advertising agency.

Learn more about Obata's deep connections and surprising contributions to global businesses at:
obata.com/obata-history/

#tbt #obatadesign #communications #marketing #STLhistory
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago

We've really been around the block. Follow Obata on our 70-year journey of downtown St. Louis and historic Soulard. We've operated out of offices from a paddlewheel boat on the riverfront to landmark office buildings and a historic church.

Learn more about our St. Louis Journey at:
obata.com/st-louis-journey/

#stlhistory #steamboat #obatadesign #historicsoulard #communications #tbt
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3 months ago

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